Izadi Home(page) -- Curriculum for Global Education



Curriculum for Global Education In Support of School Education of the 5-14 Year Olds

Excerpted from: Bahá'í Community of Filand

The main purpose of this curriculum is: To present, in one compilation and
applied to different age groups, those teaching goals that are necessary for
every child's preparation for the future
. The curriculum is especially suitable
as a basis for education for international understanding, futures education,
values education and peace education. The curriculum is designed in such
a way that it also supports parents in their educational work. When using this
curriculum as the teacher's tool, it should be borne in mind that it can in no
wise replace, or even essentially complement the educational responsibility
of the parents, because the education received at home gives direction to the
entire future spiritual growth of the child. Hence, although the teacher may
help children become aware of, for example, the principles of mutual respon-
sibility, of freedom from prejudices, or of justice, teaching them as a way of
life
remains the task of the parents.
     The principles and objectives of this curriculum are derived from the state-
ments presented by Bahá'u'lláh (1817-1892), which form the program of the
worldwide Bahá'í community. The basic educational idea is to develop chil-
dren into builders and active and responsible members of a global human
society.


1. Introduction
2. Depiction of Main Objectives
3. Goals According to Main Objectives
4. Goals According to Age Groups



1. Introduction

This curriculum was designed in the following manner: educational principles were defined which took into consideration mankind's global transition, developmental prospects of the future, possibilities for building peace, and moral values supporting these changes. From these principles the following main objectives of the curriculum were derived (see the more detailed description in chapter 2):

  1. To adopt the values necessary for the evolution of a global human society. (Ethics)

  2. To acquire knowledge of mankind's development, current state and achievements. (Knowledge)

  3. To include in the world view a discernment as to how mankind has always formed ever greater social systems, and how this process has been encouraged by man's natural urge to work in cooperation. (Understanding)

  4. To see the future of mankind as bright, and to picture in one's mind how mankind can through cooperation reach unprecedented achievements. (Vision)

  5. To learn skills concerning cooperation and the management of information, and to become directed towards acquiring skills necessary for the development of mankind. (Skills)

The applied goals for different age groups (chapters 3 & 4) have been derived from these main objectives. The curriculum includes five age groups: 5-6, 9-10, 11-12 and 13-14. The goals of each age group are thus to be achieved during a two-year period. In chapters 3 and 4 of the curriculum, identical goals for different age groups are presented in two separate ways:

  • Chapter 3: goals for different age groups are arranged under the main objectives (not under the age group headings); this presentation better exposes the contents of the main objectives and their application to each age group.

  • Chapter 4: goals for different age groups are arranged under the age groups (not under the main objective headings); this presentation is useful when planning and working out the actual task of teaching.

This curriculum is to be applied taking into consideration the needs and resources of each teacher, group of pupils and situation. Hence, it is advisable that those involved in implementing this curriculum would outline on its basis their own applied curriculum best suited to their circumstances. When planning the teaching work, it should be noted that several goals can simultaneously be promoted through a single project or form of activity.



2. Depiction of Main Objectives

1. Ethics:

1.1. To realize that the fundamental purpose of learning is the independent search for truth, commitment to truth and exercising truth in all phases of life.

1.2. To orient thoughts and identity towards advancing the interests of the whole of mankind and building a new kind of global human society in which the unique qualities and complementary merits of nations, cultures, individuals and ways of thought strengthen the solidity and activity of the society.

1.3. To value commitment to the group; to consider consultation as a valid source of authority -- that is, to commit oneself to decisions commonly arrived at and follow them through with collective responsibility.

1.4. To see man as a noble being capable of selflessness and full of potentialities -- a being who is, nonetheless, easily prone to selfishness and who needs education in order to realize his innate capabilities and inclinations in an efficient way.


2. Knowledge:

2.1. To acquire a basic knowledge of the great trends and turning points in world history and of the history and world view of various cultures and religions and their contribution to mankind's development and civilizational heritage.

2.2. To acquire a basic knowledge of recent history -- the critical position of this period of time when, for the first time, mankind is living under global conditions; to learn about the way the present-day world is managed and about the weaknesses and strengths of this way of management.

2.3. To learn about the significance of modern science and technology in human development and the opportunities they provide as means for the unification of mankind and as tools for solving worldwide problems.


3. Understanding:

3.1. To picture the history of mankind as a continuous, progressively unfolding evolutionary process towards more developed and broader forms of cooperation (tribe, city-state, nation-state, world), and not just as a meaningless chain of events.

3.2. To realize that on one hand a human being is an individual with rights and on the other hand he/she is a part of the whole with obligations, and that the whole is something greater than the sum of its parts.


4. Vision:

4.1. To perceive the present confusion of the world as a transitional stage which will in the future lead to the development of mankind into a new maturity as obsolete conceptions and structures disintegrate and new, vigorous ones rise in their stead.

4.2. To perceive as the greatest challenge and goal of our time the unification of the world -- a world in which there are common objectives in matters concerning the whole of mankind, but which, on the other hand, provides the greatest possible freedom to individuals, cultures and nations for very different ways of thinking and activities as long as they do not harm others -- a world where there is active communication, increasing knowledge, rational and just use of natural resources, and constantly new worldwide projects and modes of activity.

4.3. To perceive one's own role in life as a builder -- a seeker of new global values, models of life and ways of action, and a promoter of cooperation in a unifying world.


5. Skills:

5.1. To learn to explore sources of knowledge logically in order to form holistic pictures and to apply the understanding thus gained to different challenges and activities; to learn to express clearly and logically one's considered views for the development of human society.

5.2. To learn the skill of consultation in which the purpose is to promote the common good, not to advance one's own interest; in which the aspiration is to achieve a common understanding; in which one's own view is expressed clearly and freely, but politely; and in which all participants seek to build their opinion based primarily upon knowledge and understanding.

5.3. To learn to consider those skills and capabilities that are needed for the realization of mankind's future in practice when orienting for studies and choosing professions.



3. Goals According to Main Objectives

1. TO ADOPT THE VALUES NECESSARY FOR
THE EVOLUTION OF A GLOBAL HUMAN SOCIETY

(ETHICS)

1.1. To realize that the fundamental purpose of learning is the independent search for truth, commitment to truth and exercising truth in all phases of life:

5-6:
  • To adopt the attitude that truth indeed exists and that the truth is independent of human opinions and knowledge.
  • To be aware that man has a desire to search for truth -- for something greater than himself.
  • 7-8:
  • To adopt the attitude that seeking for the truth and acquiring knowledge is worthy in itself.
  • To adopt the attitude that it is possible for man to draw ever nearer to the truth and add to his knowledge of it, although he will never be able to grasp it completely. (To be continued in age group 9-10.)
  • 9-10:
  • To adopt the attitude that it is possible for man to draw ever nearer to the truth and add to his knowledge of it, although he will never be able to grasp it completely. (Continued from age group 7-8.).
  • 11-12:
  • To value the search after truth and the acquisition of knowledge as crucial for living the human life. (To be continued in age group 13-14.)
  • 13-14:
  • To value the search after truth and the acquisition of knowledge as crucial for living the human life. (Continued from age group 11-12.)
  • 1.2. To orient thoughts and identity towards advancing the interests of the whole of mankind and building a new kind of global human society in which the unique qualities and complementary merits of nations, cultures, individuals and ways of thought strengthen the solidity and activity of the society

    5-6:
  • To become aware of one's human need and aspiration to be part of the whole of mankind, to be part of a vast human community and to participate in its activity.
  • 7-8:
  • To view the encountering of diversity (of individuals, viewpoints, cultures, world views) always as an opportunity to learn new things. (To be continued in age group 9-10.)

  • To adopt the role of a bridge-builder between various groups of people (e.g. among school mates).
  • 9-10:
  • To view the encountering of diversity (of individuals, viewpoints, cultures, world views) always as an opportunity to learn new things. (Continued from age group 7-8.)

  • To view membership in a group as a challenge to form a functional community that can develop as a whole and also develop its surroundings and finally the world. (To be continued in age group 11-12.)
  • 11-12:
  • To view membership in a group as a challenge to form a functional community that can develop as a whole and also develop its surroundings and finally the world. (Continued from age group 9-10.)

  • To adopt an aspiration towards unity -- an aspiration to promote the formation and implementation of common (global) goals. (To be continued in age group 13-14.)
  • 13-14:
  • To adopt an aspiration towards unity -- an aspiration to promote the formation and implementation of common (global) goals. (Continued from age group 11-12.)

  • To regard activity promoting the best interests of mankind as an honour for human beings and to consider people undertaking such work as role models.
  • 1.3. To value commitment to the group; to consider consultation as a valid source of authority -- that is, to commit oneself to decisions commonly arrived at and follow them through with collective responsibility:

    5-6:
  • To regard membership in a group as a commitment that includes obligations towards that group -- commitments from which one cannot break away as one pleases. (To be continued in age group 7-8.)
  • 7-8:
  • To regard membership in a group as a commitment that includes obligations towards that group -- commitments from which one cannot break away as one pleases. (Continued from age group 5-6.)

  • To consider collective group decisions as personally binding. (To be continued in age groups 9-10 and 13-14.)
  • 9-10:
  • To consider collective group decisions as personally binding. (Continued from age group 7-8, to be continued in age group 13-14.)

  • To value the view arrived at through common consultation as wiser and more mature than that reached by an individual. (To be continued in age group 11-12.)
  • 11-12:
  • To value the view arrived at through common consultation as wiser and more mature than that reached by an individual. (Continued from age group 9-10.)
  • 13-14:
  • To consider collective group decisions as personally binding. (Continued from age groups 7-8 and 9-10.)
  • 1.4. To see man as a noble being capable of selflessness and full of potentialities -- a being who is, nonetheless, easily prone to selfishness and who needs education in order to realize his innate capabilities and inclinations in an efficient way:

    5-6:
  • To regard man as a being with magnificent latent qualities which can be revealed only through education
  • 7-8:
  • To think of man as a being with two inclinations: a yearning for truth and selflessness, and a desire for narrow-mindedness and selfishness. (To be continued in age group 9-10.)
  • 9-10:
  • To think of man as a being with two inclinations: a yearning for truth and selflessness, and a desire for narrow-mindedness and selfishness. (Continued from age group 7-8.)
  • 11-12:
  • To regard continuous development (change) and education as valuable. (To be continued in age group 13-14.)
  • 13-14:
  • To regard continuous development (change) and education as valuable. (Continued from age group 11-12.)

  • To hold the view that only through truthfulness and selflessness can one best attain to one's innate talents and aptitudes in life

  • 2. TO ACQUIRE KNOWLEDGE OF MANKIND'S
    DEVELOPMENT, CURRENT STATE AND ACHIEVEMENTS

    (KNOWLEDGE)

    2.1. To acquire a basic knowledge of the great trends and turning points in world history and of the history and world view of various cultures and religions and their contribution to mankind's development and civilizational heritage:

    5-6:
  • To learn that man's conception of reality and of the world has gradually grown during mankind's evolution
  • 7-8:
  • To acquire knowledge about the main directions of the history of mankind: prehistoric family and clan communities, the tribal society, the emergence of city-states, the evolution of nation-states, heading for a world community. (To be continued in age group 9-10.)
  • 9-10:
  • To acquire knowledge about the main directions of the history of mankind: prehistoric family and clan communities, the tribal society, the emergence of city-states, the evolution of nation-states, heading for a world community. (Continued from age group 7-8.)
  • 11-12:
  • To explore the civilizational heritage left for the whole of mankind by tribal society, city-states and nation-states, taking into consideration all the cultural regions and civilizations of the world. (To be continued in age group 13-14.)
  • 13-14:
  • To explore the civilizational heritage left for the whole of mankind by tribal society, city-states and nation-states, taking into consideration all the cultural regions and mainstream civilizations of the world. (Continued from age group 11-12.)

  • To explore the civilizational heritage bequeathed to mankind by the great world religions.
  • 2.2. To acquire a basic knowledge of recent history -- the critical position of this period of time when, for the first time, mankind is living under global conditions; to learn about the way the present-day world is managed and about the weaknesses and strengths of this way of management:

    5-6:
  • To acquire knowledge about worldwide problems (such as environmental problems, famine, shortage of energy, the refugee problem) and to become aware of their global character. (To be continued in age group 7-8.)
  • 7-8:
  • To acquire knowledge about worldwide problems (such as environmental problems, famine, shortage of energy, the refugee problem) and to become aware of their global character. (Continued from age group 5-6.)
  • 9-10:
  • To acquire a general knowledge of the unifying nature of recent history -- those common concerns, the solving of which has necessitated a more global perspective and cooperation between governments.
  • 11-12:
  • To explore the emergence of vast activities and organizations in the face of an increasing need for cooperation and the interdependence of different parts of the world.
  • 13-14:
  • To learn about the increasing need for international law and the existing deficiencies in the present international system in this respect -- for example, the absence of international bodies with legislative, executive and judiciary power.
  • 2.3. To learn about the significance of modern science and technology in human development and the opportunities they provide as means for the unification of mankind and as tools for solving worldwide problems:

    5-6:
  • To learn how modern inventions have made possible the immense increase in communication and the connecting of various parts of the world to each other (in real-time).
  • 7-8:
  • To learn how space flights and cosmological research have opened our conception of the Earth as humanity's home planet and of its position in the Universe.
  • 9-10:
  • To learn how the world has, in fact, "shrunk" as a result of the development of means of communication and transportation and because of increasing mobility.
  • 11-12:
  • To explore the history of scientific innovations and technological inventions and their influence on the development of mankind's opportunities and world view.
  • 13-14:
  • To get acquainted with the means provided by science and technology for solving global problems and administering the affairs of the international community.

  • 3. TO INCLUDE IN THE WORLD VIEW A DISCERNMENT AS TO
    HOW MANKIND HAS ALWAYS FORMED EVER GREATER SOCIAL
    SYSTEMS, AND HOW THIS PROCESS HAS BEEN ENCOURAGED
    BY MAN'S NATURAL URGE TO WORK IN COOPERATION

    (UNDERSTANDING)

    3.1. To picture the history of mankind as a continuous, progressively unfolding evolutionary process towards more developed and broader forms of cooperation (tribe, city-state, nation-state, world), and not just as a meaningless chain of events:

    5-6:
  • To understand that the general direction of the evolution of the human society has always been towards growth and unification (the family community, the tribal society, the city-state, the nation-state, the world community).
  • 7-8:
  • To perceive that the history of mankind is not just a random chain of events, but that it displays a direction of growth towards more developed forms of activity -- a quality of growth which is discernible in all living creatures and evolution. (To be continued in age group 9-10.)
  • 9-10:
  • To realize that the history of mankind is not just a random chain of events, but that it displays a direction of growth towards more developed forms of activity -- a quality of growth which is discernible in all living creatures and evolution. (Continued from age group 7-8.)
  • 11-12:
  • To understand that the life of mankind is inevitably becoming more global, that its world view is inevitably expanding, and that its members are increasingly seeing themselves as world citizens.
  • 13-14:
  • To realize that, while the continuous blending together and increasing complexity of the life of human society intensifies the difficult challenges of mankind, it simultaneously opens completely new opportunities for the emergence of a more developed world community -- in this situation, mankind can either submit to a total breakdown or strive for an unparalleled breakthrough.
  • 3.2. To realize that on one hand a human being is an individual with rights and on the other hand he/she is a part of the whole with obligations, and that the whole is something greater than the sum of its parts:

    5-6:
  • To understand that each member of a family will thrive only if the entire family is prospering.
  • 7-8:
  • To understand that the prosperity of the individual is possible only through the prosperity of the whole community -- the part does best when the prosperity of the whole is achieved.
  • 9-10:
  • To understand that rights and responsibilities go hand in hand: the freedom and rights of individuals can be secured only if there is also commitment to obligations and common rules. (To be continued in age group 11-12.)
  • 11-12:
  • To understand that rights and responsibilities go hand in hand: the freedom and rights of individuals can be secured only if there is also commitment to obligations and common rules. (Continued from age group 9-10.)

  • To understand that society is something more than just the sum of its members. (To be continued in age group 13-14.)
  • 13-14:
  • To understand that social initiative and obedience to authority need not contradict each other: in a balanced society both are equally important and complement each other's effect.

  • To understand that society is something more than just the sum of its members. (Continued from age group 11-12.)

  • 4. TO SEE THE FUTURE OF MANKIND AS BRIGHT, AND
    TO PICTURE IN ONE'S MIND HOW MANKIND CAN THROUGH
    COOPERATION REACH UNPRECEDENTED ACHIEVEMENTS

    (VISION)

    4.1. To perceive the present confusion of the world as a transitional stage which will in the future lead to the development of mankind into a new maturity as obsolete conceptions and structures disintegrate and new, vigorous ones rise in their stead:

    5-6:
  • To see that global problems will continue and intensify as long as the nations of the world have not learned to cooperate.
  • 7-8:
  • To see that obsolete ways of thinking in dealing with the affairs of the world (e.g. that the advantage of one's own country, nation, group, locality or family are given primary consideration) will, sooner or later, have to be abandoned. (To be continued in age group 9-10.)
  • 9-10:
  • To see that obsolete ways of thinking in dealing with the affairs of the world (e.g. that the advantage of one's own country, nation, group, locality or family are given primary consideration) will, sooner or later, have to be abandoned. (Continued from age group 7-8.)
  • 11-12:
  • To see that some "modern" ways of thinking are only temporal phenomena of a turbulent age, whereas others (such as increasing cooperation, cosmopolitan modes of thought, emphasis on the importance of responsibility, the growing weight of the concept of service) are the beginnings of a new world .
  • 13-14:
  • To see that present world problems will, inevitably, soon force mankind into unparalleled cooperation; to see that this cooperation will require and produce more developed international legislation and its more efficient execution.
  • 4.2. To perceive as the greatest challenge and goal of our time the unification of the world -- a world in which there are common objectives in matters concerning the whole of mankind, but which, on the other hand, provides the greatest possible freedom for individuals, cultures and nations for very different ways of thinking and activities as long as they do not harm others -- a world where there is active communication, increasing knowledge, rational and just use of natural resources, and constantly new worldwide projects and modes of activity:

    5-6:
  • To see the enormous potential inherent in interaction between people if all unnecessary obstacles and barriers (prejudices and fears, nationalism, racism, limitations of movement, factionalism, etc). are removed
  • 7-8:
  • To see how, in a world that is whole and capable of cooperation, science will improve the thinking ability, world view and health of the whole of mankind, and how it can achieve better energy consumption and technological solutions and help in creating a more just material well-being.
  • 9-10:
  • To see how, in a world that is whole and capable of cooperation, sensible practical arrangements and management of the economy will make possible the elimination of the extremes of wealth and poverty, the rational and just use of world resources, the efficient and flexible administration of world affairs, and the release of the immense resources presently used for the military industry.
  • 11-12:
  • To see how, in a world that is whole and capable of cooperation, the flow of information and communication will develop better than before, it will be possible to agree on a common second language for the nations of the world, and the press and the media will be relieved form factional and biased motivations and can focus on mirroring the multifaceted spectrum of the world.
  • 13-14:
  • To see how, in a world that is whole and capable of cooperation, arts, music, literature, architecture and other forms of art will free themselves from the molestation of a confusing world and receive from all the cultures of the world global influences through which culture can attain to unprecedented achievements.
  • 4.3. To perceive one's own role in life as a builder -- a seeker for new global values, models of life and ways of action, and a promoter of cooperation in a unifying world:

    5-6:
  • To see as one's hope, "when I grow up", to participate actively in a great adventure: the building project of a better world. (To be continued in age group 7-8.)
  • 7-8:
  • To see as one's hope, "when I grow up", to participate actively in a great adventure: the building project of a better world. (Continued from age group 5-6.)

  • To seek a future for oneself in which one's esteem in the eyes of others results from having promoted cooperation, harmony and fellowship between people.
  • 9-10:
  • To choose for oneself inspiring examples whose merits are in fruitfully and selflessly promoting the interests of mankind. (To be continued in age group 11-12.)
  • 11-12:
  • To choose for oneself inspiring examples whose merits are in fruitfully and selflessly promoting the interests of mankind. (Continued from age group 9-10.)
  • 13-14:
  • To see association with a peer group which is interested in major issues that benefit the whole world as one's ideal.

  • 5. TO LEARN SKILLS CONCERNING COOPERATION AND THE
    MANAGEMENT OF INFORMATION, AND TO BECOME DIRECTED
    TOWARDS ACQUIRING SKILLS NECESSARY FOR THE
    DEVELOPMENT OF MANKIND

    (SKILLS)

    5.1. To learn to explore sources of knowledge logically in order to form holistic pictures and to apply the understanding thus gained to different challenges and activities; to learn to express clearly and logically one's considered views for the development of human society:

    5-6:
  • To learn how to search for the answers to simple questions from books and other sources; to practice communicating the information obtained to others in a clear manner.
  • 7-8:
  • To learn how to compile information on specific themes from several different sources; to practice presenting the information thus compiled to others in a clear manner.
  • 9-10:
  • To learn how to formulate broader areas of interest into clear, precise questions; to practice searching for answers to these broad questions from various sources; to exercise forming a holistic picture from the information obtained and developing new views on the basis of this information.
  • 11-12:
  • To learn how to form new opinions based on the criterion of how useful and expanding these opinions are in terms of the interests and development of the whole human race; to practice presenting these new views in a clear manner. (To be continued in age group 13-14.)
  • 13-14:
  • To learn how to form new opinions based on the criterion of how useful and expanding these opinions are in terms of the interests and development of the whole human race; to practice presenting these new views in a clear manner. (Continued from age group 11-12.)
  • 5.2. To learn the skill of consultation in which the purpose is to promote the common good, not to advance one's own interest; in which the aspiration is to achieve a common understanding; in which one's own view is expressed clearly and freely, but politely; and in which all participants seek to build their opinion based primarily upon knowledge and understanding:

    5-6:
  • To practice bringing up important topics of discussion that are interesting to oneself and others.

  • To practice a polite and dignified manner of speaking. (To be continued in all age groups.)
  • 7-8:
  • To learn to weigh one's views in the light of facts.

  • To learn to listen to and ponder carefully the viewpoints presented by others. (To be continued in age group 9-10.)

  • To practice a polite and dignified manner of speaking. (To be continued in all age groups.)
  • 9-10:
  • To learn to listen to and ponder carefully the viewpoints presented by others. (Continued from age group 7-8.)

  • To practice striving for a shared view in conversation.

  • To practice a polite and dignified manner of speaking. (To be continued in all age groups.)
  • 11-12:
  • To learn to make joint decisions on the basis of views arrived at mutually. (To be continued in age group 13-14.)

  • To learn to keep one's emotions under control and one's thoughts as objective as possible during consultation. (To be continued in age group 13-14.)

  • To practice a polite and dignified manner of speaking. (To be continued in all age groups.)
  • 13-14:
  • To learn to make joint decisions on the basis of views arrived at mutually. (Continued from age group 11-12.)

  • To learn to keep one's emotions under control and one's thoughts as objective as possible during consultation. (Continued from age group 11-12.)

  • To practice a polite and dignified manner of speaking. (To be continued in all age groups.)
  • 5.3. To learn to consider those skills and capabilities that are needed for the realization of mankind's future in practice when orienting for studies and choosing professions:

    5-6:
  • To practice weighing the usefulness and usability of available information.
  • 7-8:
  • To practice considering the use of one's strengths and talents in a manner beneficial to all.
  • 9-10:
  • To practice considering how various professions and occupations are useful for and what is their service to the human community.
  • 11-12:
  • To learn to know the benefit and value of both practice-oriented and theory-oriented professional fields to the human community and its development.
  • 13-14:
  • To learn to examine the usefulness and service value of various fields of study and professions to the human community, and to get acquainted with the avenues that open the ways to such fields.


  • 4. Goals According to Age Groups

    AGE GROUP 5-6
    (Numbers in parentheses refer to the main objectives
    from which the goals for the age group are derived.)



    1. Goal (1.1.): To adopt the attitude that truth indeed exists and that the truth is independent of human opinions and knowledge.

    2. Goal (1.1.): To be aware that man has a desire to search for truth -- for something greater than himself.



    3. Goal (1.2.): To become aware of one's human need and aspiration to be part of the whole of mankind, to be part of a vast human community and to participate in its activity.

    4. Goal (1.3.): To regard membership in a group as a commitment that includes obligations towards that group -- commitments from which one cannot break away as one pleases. (To be continued in age group 7-8.)



    5. Goal (3.2.): To understand that each member of a family will thrive only if the entire family is prospering.

    6. Goal (4.3.): To see as one's hope, "when I grow up", to participate actively in a great adventure: the building project of a better world. (To be continued in age group 7-8.)



    7. Goal (1.4.): To regard man as a being with magnificent latent qualities which can be revealed only through education.



    8. Goal (2.1.): To understand that the prosperity of the individual is possible only through the prosperity of the whole community -- the part does best when the prosperity of the whole is achieved.

    9. Goal (3.1.): To acquire knowledge about the main directions of the history of mankind: prehistoric family and clan communities, the tribal society, the emergence of city-states, the evolution of nation-states, heading for a world community. (To be continued in age group 9-10.).



    10. Goal (2.2.): To perceive that the history of mankind is not just a random chain of events, but that it displays a direction of growth towards more developed forms of activity -- a quality of growth which is discernible in all living creatures and evolution. (To be continued in age group 9-10.).

    11. Goal (2.3.): To acquire knowledge about worldwide problems (such as environmental problems, famine, shortage of energy, the refugee problem) and to become aware of their global character. (Continued from age group 5-6.).



    12. Goal (4.1.): To see that global problems will continue and intensify as long as the nations of the world have not learned to cooperate.

    13. Goal (4.2.): To see the enormous potential inherent in interaction between people if all unnecessary obstacles and barriers (prejudices and fears, nationalism, racism, limitations of movement, factionalism, etc).



    14. Goal (5.2.): To learn how to search for the answers to simple questions from books and other sources; to practice communicating the information obtained to others in a clear manner.

    15. Goal (5.2.): To practice bringing up important topics of discussion that are interesting to oneself and others.



    16. Goal (5.2.): To practice a polite and dignified manner of speaking. (To be continued in all age groups.)

    17. Goal (5.3.): To practice weighing the usefulness and usability of available information.


    AGE GROUP 7-8
    (Numbers in parentheses refer to the main objectives
    from which the goals for the age group are derived.)



    1. Goal (1.1.): To adopt the attitude that seeking for the truth and acquiring knowledge is worthy in itself.

    2. Goal (1.1.): To adopt the attitude that it is possible for man to draw ever nearer to the truth and add to his knowledge of it, although he will never be able to grasp it completely. (To be continued in age group 9-10.)

    3. Goal (1.4.): To think of man as a being with two inclinations: a yearning for truth and selflessness, and a desire for narrow-mindedness and selfishness. (To be continued in age group 9-10.)



    4. Goal (1.2.): To view the encountering of diversity (of individuals, viewpoints, cultures, world views) always as an opportunity to learn new things. (To be continued in age group 9-10.)

    5. Goal (1.2.): To adopt the role of a bridge-builder between various groups of people (e.g. among school mates).



    6. Goal (1.3.): To regard membership in a group as a commitment that includes obligations towards that group -- commitments from which one cannot break away as one pleases. (Continued from age group 5-6.).

    7. Goal (1.3.): To consider collective group decisions as personally binding. (To be continued in age groups 9-10 and 13-14.)

    8. Goal (3.2.): To understand that the prosperity of the individual is possible only through the prosperity of the whole community -- the part does best when the prosperity of the whole is achieved.



    9. Goal (2.1.): To acquire knowledge about the main directions of the history of mankind: prehistoric family and clan communities, the tribal society, the emergence of city-states, the evolution of nation-states, heading for a world community. (To be continued in age group 9-10.)

    10. Goal (3.1.): To perceive that the history of mankind is not just a random chain of events, but that it displays a direction of growth towards more developed forms of activity -- a quality of growth which is discernible in all living creatures and evolution. (To be continued in age group 9-10.)



    11. Goal (2.2.): To acquire knowledge about worldwide problems (such as environmental problems, famine, shortage of energy, the refugee problem) and to become aware of their global character. (Continued from age group 5-6.)

    12. Goal (2.3.): To learn how space flights and cosmological research have opened our conception of the Earth as humanity's home planet and of its position in the Universe.

    13. Goal (4.1.): To see that obsolete ways of thinking in dealing with the affairs of the world (e.g. that the advantage of one's own country, nation, group, locality or family are given primary consideration) will, sooner or later, have to be abandoned. (To be continued in age group 9-10.)

    14. Goal (4.2.): To see how, in a world that is whole and capable of cooperation, science will improve the thinking ability, world view and health of the whole of mankind, and how it can achieve better energy consumption and technological solutions and help in creating a more just material well-being.

    15. Goal (4.3.): To see as one's hope, "when I grow up", to participate actively in a great adventure: the building project of a better world. (Continued from age group 5-6.).

    16. Goal (4.3.): To seek a future for oneself in which one's esteem in the eyes of others results from having promoted cooperation, harmony and fellowship between people.



    17. Goal (5.1.): To learn how to compile information on specific themes from several different sources; to practice presenting the information thus compiled to others in a clear manner.

    18. Goal (5.2.): To learn to weigh one's views in the light of facts.

    19. Goal (5.2.): To learn to listen to and ponder carefully the viewpoints presented by others.



    20. Goal (5.2.): To practice a polite and dignified manner of speaking. (To be continued in all age groups).



    21. Goal (5.3.): To practice considering the use of one's strengths and talents in a manner beneficial to all.


    AGE GROUP 9-10
    (Numbers in parentheses refer to the main objectives
    from which the goals for the age group are derived.)



    1. Goal (1.1.): To adopt the attitude that it is possible for man to draw ever nearer to the truth and add to his knowledge of it, although he will never be able to grasp it completely. (Continued from age group 7-8.)

    2. Goal (1.4.): To think of man as a being with two inclinations: a yearning for truth and selflessness, and a desire for narrow-mindedness and selfishness. (Continued from age group 7-8.)



    3. Goal (1.2.): To view the encountering of diversity (of individuals, viewpoints, cultures, world views) always as an opportunity to learn new things. (Continued from age group 7-8.)



    4. Goal (1.2.): To view membership in a group as a challenge to form a functional community that can develop as a whole and also develop its surroundings and finally the world. (To be continued in age group 11-12.)

    5. Goal (1.3.): To consider collective group decisions as personally binding. (Continued from age group 7-8, to be continued in age group 13-14.)

    6. Goal (1.3.): To value the view arrived at through common consultation as wiser and more mature than that reached by an individual. (To be continued in age group 11-12.)

    7. Goal (3.2.): To understand that rights and responsibilities go hand in hand: the freedom and rights of individuals can be secured only if there is also commitment to obligations and common rules. (To be continued in age group 11-12.)



    8. Goal (2.1.): To acquire knowledge about the main directions of the history of mankind: prehistoric family and clan communities, the tribal society, the emergence of city-states, the evolution of nation-states, heading for a world community. (Continued from age group 7-8.)

    9. Goal (2.2.): To acquire a general knowledge of the unifying nature of recent history -- those common concerns, the solving of which has necessitated a more global perspective and cooperation between governments.

    10. Goal (3.1.): To realize that the history of mankind is not just a random chain of events, but that it displays a direction of growth towards more developed forms of activity -- a quality of growth which is discernible in all living creatures and evolution. (Continued from age group 7-8.)



    11. Goal (2.3.): To learn how the world has, in fact, "shrunk" as a result of the development of means of communication and transportation and because of increasing mobility.

    12. Goal (4.1.): To see that obsolete ways of thinking in dealing with the affairs of the world will, sooner or later, have to be abandoned -- for instance that the advantage of one's own country, nation, group, locality or family are given primary consideration. (Continued from age group 7-8.)

    13. Goal (4.2.): To see how, in a world that is whole and capable of cooperation, sensible practical arrangements and management of the economy will make possible the elimination of the extremes of wealth and poverty, the rational and just use of world resources, the efficient and flexible administration of world affairs, and the release of the immense resources presently used for the military industry.

    14. Goal (4.3.): To choose for oneself inspiring examples whose merits are in fruitful and selfless for promoting the interests of mankind. (To be continued in age group 11-12.)



    15. Goal (5.1.): To learn how to formulate broader areas of interest into clear precise questions; to practice searching for answers to these broad questions from various sources; to exercise forming a holistic picture from the information obtained and developing new views on the basis of this information.

    16. Goal (5.2.): To learn to listen to and ponder carefully viewpoints presented by others. (Continued from age group 7-8.)

    17. Goal (5.2.): To practice striving for a shared view in conversation.



    18. Goal (5.2.): To practice a polite and dignified manner of speaking. (To be continued in all age groups).



    19. Goal (5.3.): To practice considering how various professions and occupations are useful for and what is their service to the human community.


    AGE GROUP 11-12
    (Numbers in parentheses refer to the main objectives
    from which the goals for the age group are derived.)



    1. Goal (1.1.): To value the search after truth and the acquisition of knowledge as crucial for living the human life. (To be continued in age group 13-14.)



    2. Goal (1.2.): To view membership in a group as a challenge to form a functional community that can develop as a whole and also develop its surroundings and finally the world. (Continued from age group 9-10.)

    3. Goal (1.2.): To adopt an aspiration towards unity -- an aspiration to promote the formation and implementation of common (global) goals. (To be continued in age group 13-14.)

    4. Goal (1.3.): To value the view arrived at through common consultation as wiser and more mature than that reached by an individual. (Continued from age group 9-10.)

    5. Goal (3.2.): To understand that rights and responsibilities go hand in hand: the freedom and rights of individuals can be secured only if there is also commitment to obligations and common rules. (Continued from age group 9-10.)

    6. Goal (3.2.): To understand that society is something more than just the sum of its members. (To be continued in age group 13-14.)



    7. Goal (1.4.): To regard continuous development (change) and education as valuable. (To be continued in age group 13-14.)



    8. Goal (2.1.): To explore the civilizational heritage left for the whole of mankind by tribal society, city-states and nation-states, taking into consideration all the cultural regions and civilizations of the world. (To be continued in age group 13-14.)

    9. Goal (2.2.): To explore the emergence of vast activities and organizations in the face of an increasing need for cooperation and the interdependence of different parts of the world.

    10. Goal (2.3.): To explore the history of scientific innovations and technological inventions and their influence on the development of mankind's opportunities and world view.

    11. Goal (3.1.): To understand that the life of mankind is inevitably becoming more global, that its world view is inevitably expanding, and that its members are increasingly seeing themselves as world citizens.



    12. Goal (4.1.): To see that some "modern" ways of thinking are only temporal phenomena of a turbulent age, whereas others (such as increasing cooperation, cosmopolitan modes of thought, emphasis on the importance of responsibility, the growing weight of the concept of service) are the beginnings of a new world.

    13. Goal (4.2.): To see how, in a world that is whole and capable of cooperation, the flow of information and communication will develop better than before, it will be possible to agree on a common second language for the nations of the world, and the press and the media will be relieved form factional and biased motivations and can focus on mirroring the multifaceted spectrum of the world.

    14. Goal (4.3.): To choose for oneself inspiring examples whose merits are in fruitful and selfless for promoting the interests of mankind. (Continued from age group 9-10.)

    15. Goal (5.1.): To learn how to form new opinions based on the criterion of how useful and expanding these opinions are in terms of the interests and development of the whole human race; to practice presenting these new views in a clear manner. (To be continued in age group 13-14.)



    16. Goal (5.2.): To learn to make joint decisions on the basis of views arrived at mutually. (To be continued in age group 13-14.)

    17. Goal (5.2.): To learn to keep one's emotions under control and one's thoughts as objective as possible during consultation. (To be continued in age group 13-14.)



    18. Goal (5.2.): To practice a polite and dignified manner of speaking. (To be continued in all age groups).



    19. Goal (5.3.): To learn to know the benefit and value of both practice-oriented and theory-oriented professional fields to the human community and its development.


    AGE GROUP 13-14
    (Numbers in parentheses refer to the main objectives
    from which the goals for the age group are derived.)



    1. Goal (1.1.): To value the search after truth and the acquisition of knowledge as crucial for living the human life. (Continued from age group 11-12.)

    2. Goal (1.4.): To hold the view that only through truthfulness and selflessness can one best attain to one's innate talents and aptitudes in life.



    3. Goal (1.2.): To adopt an aspiration towards unity -- an aspiration to promote the formation and implementation of common (global) goals. (Continued from age group 11-12.)

    4. Goal (1.2.): To regard activity promoting the best interests of mankind as an honour for human beings and to consider people undertaking such work as role models.

    5. Goal (1.3.): To consider collective group decisions as personally binding. (Continued from age groups 7-8 and 9-10.)



    6. Goal (1.4.): To regard continuous development (change) and education as valuable. (Continuation from age group 11-12.)



    7. Goal (2.1.): To explore the civilizational heritage left for the whole of mankind by tribal society, city-states and nation-states, taking into consideration all the cultural regions and civilizations of the world. (Continued from age group 11-12.)

    8. Goal (2.1.): To explore the civilizational heritage bequeathed to mankind by the great world religions.



    9. Goal (2.2.): To learn about the increasing need for international law and the deficiencies in the present international system in this respect -- for example, the absence of international bodies with legislative, executive and judiciary power.

    10. Goal (2.3.): To get acquainted with the means provided by science and technology for solving global problems and administering the affairs of the international community.

    11. Goal (3.1.): To realize that, while the continuous blending together and increasing complexity of the life of human society intensifies the difficult challenges of mankind, it simultaneously opens completely new opportunities for the emergence of a more developed world community -- in this situation, mankind can either submit to a total breakdown or strive for an unparalleled breakthrough.

    12. Goal (4.1.): To see that present world problems will, inevitably, soon force mankind into unparalleled cooperation; to see that this cooperation will require and produce more developed international legislation and its more efficient execution.

    13. Goal (4.2.): To see how, in a world that is whole and capable of cooperation, arts, music, literature, architecture and other forms of art will free themselves from the molestation of a confusing world and receive from all the cultures of the world global influences through which culture can attain to unprecedented achievements.

    14. Goal (4.3.): To see as one's ideal association with a peer group which is interested in major issues that benefit the whole world.



    15. Goal (3.2.): To understand that social initiative and obedience to authority need not contradict each other: in a balanced society both are equally important and complement each other's effect.

    16. Goal (3.2.): To understand that society is something more than just the sum of its members. (Continued from age group 11-12.)



    17. Goal (5.1.): To learn how to form new opinions based on the criterion of how useful and expanding these opinions are in terms of the interests and development of the whole human race; to practice presenting these new views in a clear manner. (Continued from age group 11-12.)

    18. Goal (5.2.): To learn making joint decisions on the basis of views arrived at mutually. (Continuation from age group 11-12.)

    19. Goal (5.2.): To learn to keep one's emotions under control and one's thoughts as objective as possible during consultation. (Continued from age group 11-12.)



    20. Goal (5.2.): To practice a polite and dignified manner of speaking. (To be continued in all age groups).



    21. Goal (5.3.): To learn to examine the usefulness and service value of various fields of study and professions to the human community, and to get acquainted with the avenues that open the ways to such fields.



    Copyright 1995    National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá'ís of Finland


    Introductory pages:

  • Bahá'u'lláh, a brief introduction.
  • A holistic worldview, a brief descpription of Bahá'u'lláh's conception of reality.
  • Vision of a United Humanity, a brief exposition of the future of humankind.
  • Some fundamental social concerns, a selection of solutions presented by Bahá'u'lláh.


    Online current materials:

  • The Promise of World Peace, a statement by the Universal House of Justice.
  • Who Is Writing the Future?, a statement by the Bahá'í International Community.
  • The Prosperity of Humankind, a statement by the Bahá'í International Community.
  • Turning Point for All Nations, a statement by the Bahá'í International Community.

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